Our History

From small beginnings to an industrial revolution, our history dates back to 1757 and is one of the cotton industry’s most historic and complete archives

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1939-2004

The War sealed the Liverpool Cotton Market’s fate. U-boat attacks and the bombing of ports and cities threatened cotton supplies and resulted in drastic action. The Government took responsibility for purchase and distribution and the Liverpool Cotton Futures Market closed. After the War the Raw Cotton Commission became the sole importer and distributor of cotton. The Cotton Market reopened in 1954, but as a shadow of its former self. In 1963 the Liverpool Cotton Association successfully reinvented itself and re-energised its membership, concentrating on the provision of specialist services such as arbitration. The Association became increasingly global in its outlook and this was reflected in its name change in 2004 to the International Cotton Association.

September 1939
World War II brings in an era of "total war"
Whereas the Liverpool Cotton Association had been able to continue with ‘business as usual’ during the First World War, it…

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31 March 1941
The Liverpool Cotton Futures Market closes
The British Government took responsibility for the purchase and distribution of all cotton supplies and revived The Cotton Control which…

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9 October 1945
The Government reveals its intention not to return to the pre-war status quo
A somewhat shocked Vice-President of the Liverpool Cotton Association, Walter R Brownwell, reported to the members the result of his…

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January 1948
The Raw Cotton Commission becomes the sole importer and distributor of cotton in the UK
The Liverpool and Manchester Cotton Associations did their best to dissuade the government from its course of action. On 2nd…

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18 May 1954
The Liverpool Cotton Market officially reopens
A change of government in 1951 offered hope to the Liverpool Cotton Association, as the Conservative Party was more sympathetic…

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27 February 1963
A new Liverpool Cotton Association emerges
Although trade increased quite considerably, the trading conditions were very different from those prevailing before 1939. Subsidies, duties and currency…

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2004
The Liverpool Cotton Association becomes the International Cotton Association
On 23 September 2004, Liverpool Cotton Association’s members approved the resolution to change the Association’s name to the International Cotton…

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